Stool Design

Over the last month or so I have been working on design algorithms using Grasshopper in Rhino 3D.  I decided to apply this fist to the stool I will need for my jewellery bench in the workshop.  The reason I chose to apply this to the stool is that I currently have a Pakistani rushty stool which is the perfect size and shape for my workbench.  So I decided to use this as the size and shape that I would use in rhino and then allow the computer algorithms to design the rest of the stool.

It has taken quite a long time and different models  perfect the final design.  I found that some of the T-splines wouldn’t Boolean union which meant I had to delete some elements.  I also had problems with some splines unioning but then the model had no volume.  To get around this I had to keep checking the volume and saving regularly to find and delete the bad splines.stoolrender

I have 3D printed a small model of the stool from my home printer.  Because the size of the university computer is about 20cm I have split the stool into eight segments that will all be printed separately.

From the model I printed I realised that the base of the model would be too thick, so to cut down on materials I have cut the larger model down to 5mm thick at the base.

The stool is now getting printed so I will be looking forwards to seeing the result.

 

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Kitchen Knife

For my Kitchen knifes I wanted to make some comparisons between a mixture of traditional and 3D printed elements of the designs.  I have decided in order to do this I will make two kitchen knives.  One will have a hand made bade and a 3D printed handle and the other will be the opposite.

I have started making the handmade blade from a piece of Damascus steel I had in my workshop.  I drew on the size and shape of the blade and cut this out using a jewellers saw.  I think I snapped about ten saw blades as the metal is really thick and hard.

  
  
 I filed off some of the rough edges and then took it to the University workshop to grind down with the hand grinder.  I have a little more finishing off and grinding to do before I will design the handle for it.  I am waiting to know the exact size of the piece before designing the handle so I know it will fit perfectly.

Raising Hammer

Last week my handle for the raising hammer I made in Hungary was CNC milled in birch wood.  It had taken quite a lot of time because previously it had been milled in oak.  When I spoke to the wood technician he said that the grain of the wood was at an angle and that this would split when used.  It brought up a very interesting conversation about the need for craftsmen and traditional crafts skills in the field of modern technologies.  Not all items made using modern technologies will work or be better than something handcrafted but that it is the knowledge of both that are needed to apply ideas.

  
I glued the handle together in the workshop with wood glue and clamped together for around an hour.

 When the handle was taken off the milling machine it had supports on the sides, I cut these off with a saw.  I then filed and sanded the handle and fixed the hammer head in using epoxy resin.

  
I am now using Danish oil on the handle every day for the next week.  I still have to drill a hole through both the handle and the head to fix a rod through.