Copper Bowl

 

I had a very exciting few days in the workshop testing my hammer.  One thing that I didn’t realised was that the handle was too big to grip properly.  So I went to the wood workshop and got it sanded down on the belt sander.

Sandra Wilson then gave me a quick afternoon master class in Dutch Raising.  Dutch raising differs from the more well known technique of angle raising in that you hammer from the inside of your piece out.  This creates a wave in the metal as you push the metal round.  After each round you calque the edges and the re-anneal.

The second day I continued the piece and go to the planishing stage.  I used my 3D printed steel planishing hammer.  I also used the wrong steak at one point which put dints into the bottom of the bowl.  I actually quite liked this so I ran with it.

 



I wanted to finish the bowl well and in an interesting way.  I had some copper foil which I wanted to use for the inside of the bowl.  I tried a sample of copper on copper kuem-boo but this didn’t work because copper doesn’t fuse.  the samples just flaked off and they also changed to a more pastel colour.

I decided then to leaf the inside using adhesive.  The outside of the bowl I finished with platinol and I burnished the top edge to a shine.

 

Stool design

After going through many CAD model designs for the stool.  I decided to have a go at constructing a stool thought 3D printing plastic joins that would hold the structure in place whilst welding.  I ran into a few problems very quickly in the construction of the base.  After welding most of the base together I realised that the steel had warped.  this could have been due to heat expansion.

There were also parts of the design that were too close together and difficult to impossible to weld.

After spending a few weeks on this I decided to go back to the drawing board and simplify the design.  I drew many other models that gradually became more simple.  I still wasn’t entirely happy with the construction and felt what I was trying to achieve was far too complex and may not end up with a good result.stool.png

After discussion with Jon Christie about furniture he suggested that a simple three lagged stool is the most stable stool you can have.  As the stool is for my workshop I felt it was an important design idea.  I then spent a few more CAD models perfecting just one element that would be 3D printed to hold together my stool.  stooltop

The piece can be screwed into the seat from the middle and the three legs can be slotted in.  I am now in the process of 3D printing a prototype to test the element.

seatbit

Kitchen knife

One of the main tools I need in my kitchen would be knives.  This is the second knife I worked on.  For this I designed the knife in CAD and 3D printed the blade in steel.  The cost of a solid knife was far too expensive to justify 3D printing, so I decided to cut out most of the weight from the middle of the knife.

knife1

I then used algorithms in grasshopper to put back in place a structure to give more strength to the piece.  Using grasshopper allowed me to play with the structure until I found an arrangement I was happy with.  This was great in this particular case as if I had drawn this in rhino alone I would have only had the option I had drawn and it would have been far more difficult to change.

kniferend

The knife cost £34.15 to print from Shapeways.

The first job I had was to sharpen the blade.  I didn’t want to temper the steel so I avoided using a machine to grind the edges.  At first I used a file which took off most of the edge.  I was then given a sharpening stone from a friend which was far easier for the job and took very little time.

The next job I had was to make the handle.  I wanted a contrast in the piece between handmade and CAD build work as I felt this would add part of my soul into the work more with combining the handmade element.

I cut a piece of metal to act as a stopper at the end of the handle.  This slipped down to join between the handle and the blade to make the piece look a bit neater.  I then made the handle using a piece of exotic hard wood called black plamera.  I cut the wood in half and cut out the shape of the handle.  In the centre of the piece I placed some dark blue acrylic sandwiched between light gathering plastic so that when you hold it up to the light you can see through the piece. 

    
    
 

After gluing the handle together with epoxy resin I glued two brass rods though the handle to secure.

 

untitled

I then filed the handle into shape and sanded down to a high finish.  I used Danish oil to finish the wood to a high polish.

untitled2