Laser cut bowl

This morning I amended my laser cutting bowl file from my failed attempt yesterday. I moved out the slats and ran a few tests to make sure the sections slotted in tightly.
I decided not to use any glue when slotting in the sections as yesterday it had reacted with the plastic and left a messy white stain.  

It took a little tweaking to get all the parts to go in to the top and bottom sections, but the final piece holds together well.


I laser cut some rings the same size as the top of the bowl and glued them together using super glue to make a press mold. 




I cut a piece of copper just larger than the press mold and annealed it. 


I then placed the copper on the press mold with rubber above and pressed the copper. 
I didn’t want the copper to snap at the rim so I took it up to two bar and then re-annealed it.

I pressed again taking the pressure up to three bars.  

I then pierced out the edge of the copper bowl and filed it.

I used 280 grit wet and dry paper to put a mat finish on the copper using a circular motion. 

Instead of polishing to a high finish which would oxidise quickly anyway I decided to use platinol to blacken the copper.

I am pretty happy with the finished piece although I am not happy with some of the platinol and may re-apply this tomorrow.

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Laser cut bowl 

Today I tried laser cutting some of my bowl designs.  I cut one version that slots in to the top and bottom and one that just slots in to a bottom section with a flat cut top. 


I slotted the pieces together and glued them in to position,  I found that the design was a little tight in the centre section.  It was quite difficult to judge what the line thickness should be in CAD for the slots as the laser melts some material around it.  

After squeezing together the plastic the piece smashed so I will need to redesign it for tomorrow. 

3D printed bowl

I recently got some tough flexible plastic filament for my M3D printer.  I decided to test it using the design I had produced for my CNC bowl.  It took 25 hours to print.  The great thing about the material is that I didn’t have any problems with it snapping mid build as I have with regular filament. 



Once the print was finished I removed it from the bed and started to remove the support material with pliers.  Although the material is very strong and flexible it was quite difficult to remove the supports in a clean way.

Mixed material bowls

I have been spending the last few weeks designing various bowls that I can test materials with.  I plan to make all of the outside sections through direct processes such as laser cutting, syntering and 3D printing.  All the internal bowls I plan to make using traditional techniques only using modern technology to make the tooling.
Laser cutting ideas:

laserbowl1laserbowl2

Laser syntering in steel:

steelsteel2steel3

CNC milling ideas:

walnutbowl1walnutbowl2walnutbowl3walnutbowl4walnutbowl5