Water jug

I have been raising a small water jug which I intend to make into a set with two glasses over the next few weeks. 

I used my 3D printed brass hammer to do most of the raising.  I wanted to take a similar from to a traditional whisky tumbler only with a small spout. 

I finished off the piece with my 3D printed steel texturing hammer which gave an interesting finish.

The last thing I did was hammer in the spout. I used the edge of a hammer to do this.  I still have some finishing to do. I’m not entirely happy with the shape around the middle and around the rim.

I feel I may need to make a wooden stake to give me the right shape.

I am planning on 3D printing a base for it to stand as well as a matching handle. 

Ceramic Update

I finally got my shot glasses back from their third and final firing.  Again they are a little smaller than I had hoped .  Some are more useable than others but I have enough for a collection.  I am really happy with the finish on the glaze with the final green added.  It gives the pieces individuality and makes then feel more organic. 

 
I am also really happy with the way the detailing from the rough print has came out in contrast to the smoother mold printed. 

 

Over the last few weeks I have been having problems with the goblets bending at the stem and touching other items in the kiln.  Although I gave a few of them a knock and they came apart they are imperfect and I plan to redesign the whole thing. 

   
  
The pint tumblers are working out great.  I have a perfect set of four now and a few more in the process of making.

  
 

Ceramic Ware- Update

Today I got back my shot glasses from their first glaze firing.  I have painted them all  with the green glaze I bought and tested a few months ago.  I decided to paint them all different  to each other so that when they are being used people know which one is their glass.

I am still not having a lot of luck with the wine goblets.  The one that I tested last I left to dry before cleaning up to see if it holds together better.  When I came to clean it up I noticed it had a slight lean and a small crack at the bottom of the stem.  It is still in tact and I have put it in to bisque fire however I am not very hopeful and I plan to redesign the whole goblet and start again to make it stronger.

 

On the plus side I got back two more pint glasses which I glazed today.  I am very please with how these are working out and I will soon have a set.

 

Happy Ceramic Day…. So Far!

The plan that I came up with yesterday to leave the goblet alone to dry is so far working.  It was still standing after four hours so I am keeping my fingers crossed that this approach will work. 

 I also managed to cast another pint tumbler today.  I am starting to become really quick at these.  They cast like a dream, are easy to take out of the mold and are also very quick to clean up as they only have two seams.  The following image also shows the goblet I made on Monday which is also cracked at the stem. 

 This afternoon I got all my shot glasses from the bisque firing as well as one of the pint glasses.  I glazed these with clear porcelain glaze.  I plan to fire for a third time with the green glass I used for my test pieces.  I dipped all the vessels into the glaze and then touched up where my finger prints were with a paint brush.  Afterwards I removed the glaze from the underneath by rubbing them on a wet carpet. 

 Shot glasses after bisque firing.

  Vessels after glazing and painting over finger prints.

Whisky Glasses

This week I embarked on a run of making all my shot glasses.  The reason it took me so long to get to this point is that I have been testing lots of different sizes and glazes.  The mold for this differs from the one I used from the samples as I printed on half on its side which added a different and more defined texture to the of the piece. 

 The only tools I used to make these were the press mold and a sponge to clean off the edges.  I have now taken them to get fired and will glaze later next week. 

 

Shot glass samples

I got back my shot glass samples from the second firing and glazing.  The red glaze was fired slightly too high and the colour burnt out.      I was however very pleased with the green.  It has a nice turquoise sheen to the surface.

    

Within the samples I experimented with different ways of glazing them.  Some of the samples had two coats anfd others had three.  I found that the ones that had three coats was too much and the glaze ran onto the kiln shelf.  Some of these broke when removing from the kiln and looked unsightly.  I shall therefore be glazing my final glasses with two coats.

  
This is my favourite design that I feel I will be using for the final run I will be making.  I have glazed the inside with white as it is non-toxic.

 Over the last few weeks I have also been re-printing the press molds at a greater size to take into account shrinkage.  I sampled this the other night.  I tried to make the walls a little thinner than in the samples so they will feel a little more delicate.  I had problems with one part of the top of the mold which has a deep overhang.  I cant remove the clay without this part ripping.  I have decided I will redesign this half of the mold and re-print it before making the full set.

Whisky glass pressing

Today I have been trying out the press mold for my whisky glasses.  The first few I did were a little floored but the more I made the better they became.  My 3D printed chizel was perfect for cutting off the excess clay from the top of the mold.  I was keen to see the effect of using molds printed on different machines.  The mold from the ultimaker gave a much smoother finish to the pieces.  I like the effect of the two contrasting textures.

 Close up showing both textures in the clay.
 Selection I have made so far.
Some of the vessels came out with areas that were not smooth.  I found placing the clay back into the molds and pressing them again sorted out this problem.

Mold before use.


Clay pressed into the mold.


Clay cut with 3D printed chisel.

To speed up the drying process I used my hair dryer.  This worked well for the clay but warped the outside of the orange mold slightly with the heat.  The inside seems to not have been effected which is good.


Clay smoothed down and drying  also showing warped mold.

Shot Glass Press molds

After spending Saturday and Sunday trying to print out the press mold from my M3D micro I have been left with a pile of nice white and orange spaghetti resembling parts of my mold.  I managed to get one half of the mold printed ok.  This is in orange PLA.  This morning David at the City of Glasgow College kindly printed the second half for me in a bright red PLA from the College ultimaker machine.  The ultimaker gave a much smoother finish than the M3D.  I will try the two parts with clay but may need to get both printed on the same machine.

Failed M3D print on lowest quality setting.

  Print from the ultimaker machine.

I did manage to get a few samples from the half build press molds over the weekend.  I placed the join of the molds where the join of the triangles meet in the piece so that the final piece is less messy to look at by eye.  I used my 3D printed Chizel to take the excess clay off the mold.

 


A few of the first pieces I tried were quite difficult to get out of the molds when wet.  I tried spraying the mold with wD40 before hand and then drying the clay a little with my hairdryer before removing.  This made the process much easier.


I am happy with the form of the pieces.  I think maybe I should try accentuating the overhangs in some places where they might be a little subtle or lost compared to other sections.

Whisky Vessels

After spending a few weeks playing with porcelain and designing the ceramic bedroom light it has given me some ideas for making drinking vessels for my container.  I have been coming up with some designs in my sketchbook along the same lines as the base of the bedroom light I have designed.


Through these pieces I would really like to be able to show the mixture and contrast between the handmade and the use of CAD.  What I really enjoy about this with clay is the way in which clay is naturally so organic and malleable by hand.  It makes the process easy to both impress on and use CAD but also has a warm hand made finish or feeling.

The glasses will be pressed into CAD molds and hand finished on the inside.  I would really like to use a simple white cracked glaze on the outside and a more metallic glaze splash of colour on the inside.

shotglass5Render of shot glass designs.

Last night I came home from work excitedly with plans to print a small shot glass and make them over the weekend.  As I went to bed last night I set my printer up to print the mold through the night.  I woke up at 4am to a strange buzzing noise.  As I got out of bed I found a big pile of white spaghetti in my printer.  The print was due to take 7 hours, so I collaborated the printer set up the print again and went back to bed.

 My overnight print fails.

The same thing happened at 8am and again at 10am.  I have cut down the mold size a little to make the build 5 hours and put on to build again.  Fingers crossed this one is going to work so I can make some shot glasses later.