3D printed bowl

I recently got some tough flexible plastic filament for my M3D printer.  I decided to test it using the design I had produced for my CNC bowl.  It took 25 hours to print.  The great thing about the material is that I didn’t have any problems with it snapping mid build as I have with regular filament. 



Once the print was finished I removed it from the bed and started to remove the support material with pliers.  Although the material is very strong and flexible it was quite difficult to remove the supports in a clean way.

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Mixed material bowls

I have been spending the last few weeks designing various bowls that I can test materials with.  I plan to make all of the outside sections through direct processes such as laser cutting, syntering and 3D printing.  All the internal bowls I plan to make using traditional techniques only using modern technology to make the tooling.
Laser cutting ideas:

laserbowl1laserbowl2

Laser syntering in steel:

steelsteel2steel3

CNC milling ideas:

walnutbowl1walnutbowl2walnutbowl3walnutbowl4walnutbowl5

Egg cups continued…….

I have been working more on my egg cups this week. I just? I am now happy with the general shape of them. If there is one thing I am a little disappointed about it is that I have lost the thickness created by colquing the edge and then cutting it off.

https://youtu.be/mFLEpmtltxU

I started planishing one of the cups. I soon found that there were a few lines still visible in the head of the hammer from the 3D printing. I sanded and polished these out before continuing.​​

 ​Before planishing the cups I annealed the copper again and drew on lines as I did when raising.  I then planished from the inside out twice and I may repeat this again.  I am happy with the shine this has created.

Cutlery tests

I got my first press mould back from the make space this week.  I decided I would just print the spoon to begin with as a test.  I first used some 0.35mm copper to make sure both the press was strong enough and I can use the thin copper one as a master shape. 

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I after cutting this out I hammered it flat and used it as a template for a 1mm thick press. 
I am happy with both the shape of the handle and the spoon, however the neck is a little thin and I feel I need to plannish this to strengthen it.  I may need to make a stake for this as nothing is fitting in the workshop. ​

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I spent some time cleaning up.  I think I need to make the shape of the neck a little thinner on the template as this one was overlapping slightly.  This will also hardened the metal more but I’m risking loosing strength in the width. 

To be continued………..

Egg Cups

I have been really enjoying raising metal in the workshop over the last few months. Aside from getting very toned in one arm, there is something very therapeutic about creating objects by hand.


I first cut out two disks 75mm radius.  I later had to cut this down by about 12mm so I should have begun with 62-64mm.  This means the edge on this piece will be thinner than I would like. 

I have almost got them to the shape I like but want to bring in an egg next week to make sure they fit perfectly. 

I plan to 3D print and cast matching bases for them.

Water jug

I have been raising a small water jug which I intend to make into a set with two glasses over the next few weeks. 

I used my 3D printed brass hammer to do most of the raising.  I wanted to take a similar from to a traditional whisky tumbler only with a small spout. 

I finished off the piece with my 3D printed steel texturing hammer which gave an interesting finish.

The last thing I did was hammer in the spout. I used the edge of a hammer to do this.  I still have some finishing to do. I’m not entirely happy with the shape around the middle and around the rim.

I feel I may need to make a wooden stake to give me the right shape.

I am planning on 3D printing a base for it to stand as well as a matching handle. 

Cutlery

This week I have started to design my cutlery in CAD.  I have been thinking about this for a long while and trying to decide weather to hand forge them with my 3D printed hammer or press them.  As I have time restraints on the build I decided that pressing them would cut down time in production of a large quantity.

1

I have played around with shapes and forms and decided to go for something simple but with a twist in the form.  The CAD models have taken about 3-4 days of trying to come up with the best forms.  I’m the end I used a combination of t-splines and surface modelling.  Although the surface modelling took a lot longer I got better results.2

I should get the press mold back next week to try the spoon as a test.  Then I can make any tweeks I need to make to the design of the mould fore the rest or the range.4

Raising Hammer

Last week my handle for the raising hammer I made in Hungary was CNC milled in birch wood.  It had taken quite a lot of time because previously it had been milled in oak.  When I spoke to the wood technician he said that the grain of the wood was at an angle and that this would split when used.  It brought up a very interesting conversation about the need for craftsmen and traditional crafts skills in the field of modern technologies.  Not all items made using modern technologies will work or be better than something handcrafted but that it is the knowledge of both that are needed to apply ideas.

  
I glued the handle together in the workshop with wood glue and clamped together for around an hour.

 When the handle was taken off the milling machine it had supports on the sides, I cut these off with a saw.  I then filed and sanded the handle and fixed the hammer head in using epoxy resin.

  
I am now using Danish oil on the handle every day for the next week.  I still have to drill a hole through both the handle and the head to fix a rod through.

  

Crochet Update

Over the last few weeks I have been making a lot of the textiles for the house.   I spent a day a few weeks ago learning some new patterns and experimenting.

  

After trying about 4-5 new designs I decided I would start to make a curtain for the container windows.  I went with a very neutral cream colour as I want the main features to be both the view from the windows and the interior.

  

I have also started making some cushion covers for the living room.  I have decided to go with green and cream as a colour theme to reflect the surrounding forest area.  I have run with the pleated pattern idea as it is a fairly simple yet effective design.

After crocheting half of one of the covers my crochet needle snapped.  I have been using this since November so it wasn’t a bad life span for a piece of 3D printed plastic.  I am currently in the process of printing off another one which will take an hour to print.  This is much quicker and cheaper than getting the bus to town or ordering one online.

 After about 20mins use the hook I printed in low quality broke.  I was able to see viably the strands of plastic poking out of the break like frayed string.  I then re-printed the hook in high quality which took 2 hours 20mins to print.

Raising Hammer

I put together the raising hammer mold in exactly the same way as the sea horse mold.I found that at the casting stage of this I had problems.


I think I had placed the hammer too far down and as it was a little larger than the previous hammer, I needed an air hole in there.


I rebuilt the mold in the afternoon, placing the hammer closer to the top of the mold and with two air holes in to draw out the metal.

 

Later in the evening we went for a second pour.

This time the piece worked really well an I was ready to clean up both my claw hammer and raising hammer.