Egg cup

​​I got my egg cup back from the milling machine this week.  This time I cut it into walnut as the last one I made I wasn’t particularly happy with the wood.  It was too soft and didn’t have a nice finish after sanding.

I started by cutting out the two sections using my jewellery saw.  ​I first sawed into the frame and then cut each of the supports off one at a time.  I left a little material from the edge of the piece so as to make sure I didn’t cut into the part I needed.

I then sanded both the inside edges flat and glued together using wood glue.

 

 

I didn’t want to mark the wood by putting it in my large rusty vice so I decided to bind it with some copper wire.  I found this was better for keeping the edges aligned to each other.  When using the vice, I found the two sections more difficult to keep aligned.

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After leaving the glue to dry solid,  I filed down the excess supports using a large steel file.  The smaller sections which was harder to file I used a small flat needle file.  The wood was much nicer to work in than the previous one I used.  The walnut felt much stronger and I could feel the difference in quality and way it worked instantly.

After filing off the supports I sanded the piece all over through different ascending sandpapers.

After sanding I put a layer of Danish oil on the wood and rubbed it back afte Continue reading Egg cup

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Raising Hammer

Last week my handle for the raising hammer I made in Hungary was CNC milled in birch wood.  It had taken quite a lot of time because previously it had been milled in oak.  When I spoke to the wood technician he said that the grain of the wood was at an angle and that this would split when used.  It brought up a very interesting conversation about the need for craftsmen and traditional crafts skills in the field of modern technologies.  Not all items made using modern technologies will work or be better than something handcrafted but that it is the knowledge of both that are needed to apply ideas.

  
I glued the handle together in the workshop with wood glue and clamped together for around an hour.

 When the handle was taken off the milling machine it had supports on the sides, I cut these off with a saw.  I then filed and sanded the handle and fixed the hammer head in using epoxy resin.

  
I am now using Danish oil on the handle every day for the next week.  I still have to drill a hole through both the handle and the head to fix a rod through.