Laser cut bowl

This morning I amended my laser cutting bowl file from my failed attempt yesterday. I moved out the slats and ran a few tests to make sure the sections slotted in tightly.
I decided not to use any glue when slotting in the sections as yesterday it had reacted with the plastic and left a messy white stain.  

It took a little tweaking to get all the parts to go in to the top and bottom sections, but the final piece holds together well.


I laser cut some rings the same size as the top of the bowl and glued them together using super glue to make a press mold. 




I cut a piece of copper just larger than the press mold and annealed it. 


I then placed the copper on the press mold with rubber above and pressed the copper. 
I didn’t want the copper to snap at the rim so I took it up to two bar and then re-annealed it.

I pressed again taking the pressure up to three bars.  

I then pierced out the edge of the copper bowl and filed it.

I used 280 grit wet and dry paper to put a mat finish on the copper using a circular motion. 

Instead of polishing to a high finish which would oxidise quickly anyway I decided to use platinol to blacken the copper.

I am pretty happy with the finished piece although I am not happy with some of the platinol and may re-apply this tomorrow.

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Egg cups continued…….

I have been working more on my egg cups this week. I just? I am now happy with the general shape of them. If there is one thing I am a little disappointed about it is that I have lost the thickness created by colquing the edge and then cutting it off.

https://youtu.be/mFLEpmtltxU

I started planishing one of the cups. I soon found that there were a few lines still visible in the head of the hammer from the 3D printing. I sanded and polished these out before continuing.​​

 ​Before planishing the cups I annealed the copper again and drew on lines as I did when raising.  I then planished from the inside out twice and I may repeat this again.  I am happy with the shine this has created.

Cutlery tests

I got my first press mould back from the make space this week.  I decided I would just print the spoon to begin with as a test.  I first used some 0.35mm copper to make sure both the press was strong enough and I can use the thin copper one as a master shape. 

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I after cutting this out I hammered it flat and used it as a template for a 1mm thick press. 
I am happy with both the shape of the handle and the spoon, however the neck is a little thin and I feel I need to plannish this to strengthen it.  I may need to make a stake for this as nothing is fitting in the workshop. ​

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I spent some time cleaning up.  I think I need to make the shape of the neck a little thinner on the template as this one was overlapping slightly.  This will also hardened the metal more but I’m risking loosing strength in the width. 

To be continued………..

Egg Cups

I have been really enjoying raising metal in the workshop over the last few months. Aside from getting very toned in one arm, there is something very therapeutic about creating objects by hand.


I first cut out two disks 75mm radius.  I later had to cut this down by about 12mm so I should have begun with 62-64mm.  This means the edge on this piece will be thinner than I would like. 

I have almost got them to the shape I like but want to bring in an egg next week to make sure they fit perfectly. 

I plan to 3D print and cast matching bases for them.

Water jug

I have been raising a small water jug which I intend to make into a set with two glasses over the next few weeks. 

I used my 3D printed brass hammer to do most of the raising.  I wanted to take a similar from to a traditional whisky tumbler only with a small spout. 

I finished off the piece with my 3D printed steel texturing hammer which gave an interesting finish.

The last thing I did was hammer in the spout. I used the edge of a hammer to do this.  I still have some finishing to do. I’m not entirely happy with the shape around the middle and around the rim.

I feel I may need to make a wooden stake to give me the right shape.

I am planning on 3D printing a base for it to stand as well as a matching handle. 

Copper Bowl

 

I had a very exciting few days in the workshop testing my hammer.  One thing that I didn’t realised was that the handle was too big to grip properly.  So I went to the wood workshop and got it sanded down on the belt sander.

Sandra Wilson then gave me a quick afternoon master class in Dutch Raising.  Dutch raising differs from the more well known technique of angle raising in that you hammer from the inside of your piece out.  This creates a wave in the metal as you push the metal round.  After each round you calque the edges and the re-anneal.

The second day I continued the piece and go to the planishing stage.  I used my 3D printed steel planishing hammer.  I also used the wrong steak at one point which put dints into the bottom of the bowl.  I actually quite liked this so I ran with it.

 



I wanted to finish the bowl well and in an interesting way.  I had some copper foil which I wanted to use for the inside of the bowl.  I tried a sample of copper on copper kuem-boo but this didn’t work because copper doesn’t fuse.  the samples just flaked off and they also changed to a more pastel colour.

I decided then to leaf the inside using adhesive.  The outside of the bowl I finished with platinol and I burnished the top edge to a shine.