Carbon fibre bowl 

The first of my new filaments I tested was the carbon fibre and I printed this on my home M3D printer.  It printed very easily and the support material was very easy to remove.  The finished material gave very fine lines and felt quite strong.  


I sanded down the top surface to see what the material would look like polished up.  I was really happy with the finish.  It gave a great shine.  

I decided that for this piece I would hand raise the other sections of the bowl using my 3D printed hammers.  ​

I used my laser sintered hammer initially to  planish the bowl.  Unfortunately this broke very soon in to the process.  The internal section looked very powdery due to the two part green process that Shapeways use.  I think this makes the metal much weaker.  I am going to try and reprint this on the direct steel sintering machine in Aberdeen and see if that makes any difference.  
 

I raised a smaller inside bowl to the piece in the same way.  However I had to use a regular planishing hammer to finish off both.  I must confess however that as the inside bowl was so small and fiddly I hand raised it to a certain point and then used the larger doming punch in the department to get the final shape.



I decided I liked the contrast of copper and black and oxidised the inside of the larger bowl and outside of the smaller.  I used a two part resin and mixed this in to the bowl.  I am regretting not testing this first as it seemed to react.  I am hoping that it will dry enough to sand back and make it look good but if this doesn’t work I will have to re-make it and test another type of resin. The other reason it may have reacted like this would be if there had been some moisture in the bowl before I added the resin.​


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Egg cup

​​I got my egg cup back from the milling machine this week.  This time I cut it into walnut as the last one I made I wasn’t particularly happy with the wood.  It was too soft and didn’t have a nice finish after sanding.

I started by cutting out the two sections using my jewellery saw.  ​I first sawed into the frame and then cut each of the supports off one at a time.  I left a little material from the edge of the piece so as to make sure I didn’t cut into the part I needed.

I then sanded both the inside edges flat and glued together using wood glue.

 

 

I didn’t want to mark the wood by putting it in my large rusty vice so I decided to bind it with some copper wire.  I found this was better for keeping the edges aligned to each other.  When using the vice, I found the two sections more difficult to keep aligned.

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After leaving the glue to dry solid,  I filed down the excess supports using a large steel file.  The smaller sections which was harder to file I used a small flat needle file.  The wood was much nicer to work in than the previous one I used.  The walnut felt much stronger and I could feel the difference in quality and way it worked instantly.

After filing off the supports I sanded the piece all over through different ascending sandpapers.

After sanding I put a layer of Danish oil on the wood and rubbed it back afte Continue reading Egg cup

Stone Axe

Today I 3D scanned a stone aged axe my Grandad found many years ago in England. I have always loved the shape and form of the tool and how it fits perfectly into the hand.

I wanted to use this form to create tools to make forms for pieces for the house.

I scanned the axe at the university and then used the files to create both silversmithing stakes and hammers.

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For the stakes I kept the original size of the axe and added a section that would allow it to be gripped in a vice.  For the hammers I scaled down the model to 85mm and cut out a hole for the handle.

stoneaxehammersAxestakes

I am planning on 3D printing the models and casting them possibly in bronze.

Egg cups continued…….

I have been working more on my egg cups this week. I just? I am now happy with the general shape of them. If there is one thing I am a little disappointed about it is that I have lost the thickness created by colquing the edge and then cutting it off.

https://youtu.be/mFLEpmtltxU

I started planishing one of the cups. I soon found that there were a few lines still visible in the head of the hammer from the 3D printing. I sanded and polished these out before continuing.​​

 ​Before planishing the cups I annealed the copper again and drew on lines as I did when raising.  I then planished from the inside out twice and I may repeat this again.  I am happy with the shine this has created.

Egg Cups

I have been really enjoying raising metal in the workshop over the last few months. Aside from getting very toned in one arm, there is something very therapeutic about creating objects by hand.


I first cut out two disks 75mm radius.  I later had to cut this down by about 12mm so I should have begun with 62-64mm.  This means the edge on this piece will be thinner than I would like. 

I have almost got them to the shape I like but want to bring in an egg next week to make sure they fit perfectly. 

I plan to 3D print and cast matching bases for them.

Water jug

I have been raising a small water jug which I intend to make into a set with two glasses over the next few weeks. 

I used my 3D printed brass hammer to do most of the raising.  I wanted to take a similar from to a traditional whisky tumbler only with a small spout. 

I finished off the piece with my 3D printed steel texturing hammer which gave an interesting finish.

The last thing I did was hammer in the spout. I used the edge of a hammer to do this.  I still have some finishing to do. I’m not entirely happy with the shape around the middle and around the rim.

I feel I may need to make a wooden stake to give me the right shape.

I am planning on 3D printing a base for it to stand as well as a matching handle.